New book releases for August 2017

The Bedlam Stacks by Natasha Pulley

Merrick, a crippled smuggler working for the East India Company, heads deep into uncharted territory to find cinchona trees, the only source of the quinine that can cure malaria. Surrounded by local stories of lost time, cursed woods and living rock, Merrick must separate truth from fairytale and find out what befell the last expeditions.

Last year I read Pulley’s debut, The Watchmaker of Filigree Street, and it was one of my favourite books of 2016. I’ve already read The Bedlam Stacks, and can confirm that it is just as magical and surprising as her debut. (Full review coming soon)

Release date: 1st August

The Last Tudor by Philippa Gregory

The true story of the three Grey sisters: Jane, Queen of England for nine days; Katherine, whose lineage makes her a threat to the rightful succession; and Mary, a dwarf disregarded by the court but all too aware of her position as a possible heir to the throne.

There is no writer who can match Gregory for historical fiction and her books set in Tudor England are often her best. She tells stories with intelligence and verve, focusing her books on real women navigating the dangerous waters of court politics.

Release date: 8th August

How Not to Be a Boy by Robert Webb

Don’t cry, love sport, play rough, drink beer, don’t talk about feelings. But Robert Webb has started to wonder if any of those rules are actually any use? To anyone? Looking back over his life, Webb considers the absurd expectations boys and men have thrust upon them.

The only autobiography I’ve ever read is Roald Dahl’s, so Webb’s book will be a departure from my usual reading material. However, I do love his sense of humour and it’s been a while since I read a book that has the potential to make me laugh out loud.

Release date: 29th August

The Half-Drowned King by Linnea Hartsuyker

Since the death of Ragnvald’s father in battle, he has worked hard to protect his sister, Svanhild, and planned to inherit his family’s land when he comes of age. But when the captain of his ship tries to kill him, he must confront his stepfather’s betrayal and find a way to protect his birthright.

This saga of Viking-era Norway sounds exciting and different, and has already been described as ‘vivid and gripping’. Steeped in legend and myth, it promises to be a swashbuckling historical epic.

Release date: 1st August

Beautiful Animals by Lawrence Osborne

Samantha and Naomi meet during a white-hot summer on the idyllic Greek island of Hydra. They find a young Arab man, Faoud, washed up on shore, a casualty of the crisis raging across the Aegean. But when their plan to help the stranger goes wrong, all must face the consequences.

This sounds like the perfect holiday read. It has been compared to The Great Gatsby by the New York Times Book Review; a bold claim, and only time will tell if it’s justified.

Release date: 10th August

The Half-Drowned King by Linnea Hartsuyker SV

Impossible Views of the World by Lucy Ives

Stella Krakus, a curator at Manhattan’s renowned Central Museum of Art, is having the roughest week ever, including the fact a beloved colleague, Paul, has gone missing. The appearance of a strange map sends Stella on an all-consuming research mission where she discovers the secret Paul’s been keeping.

This book has received a wealth of praise already, having been called ‘magical’, ‘mysterious’ and ‘mesmerising’, and Ives’ credentials as a poet promise beautiful writing.

Release date: 3rd August

The Clockwork Dynasty by Daniel H. Wilson

When a young anthropologist uncovers a terrible secret concealed in the workings of a 300-year-old mechanical doll, she is thrown into a hidden world. With her career and her life at stake, June will embark on an around-the-world adventure and discover breath-taking secrets of the past.

I do enjoy an alternative history novel, but it’s hard finding ones that are written well. Promising artificial intelligence, steampunk and a thrilling adventure, let’s hope this one lives up to expectations.

Release date: 1st August

The Word is Murder by Anthony Horowitz

A wealthy woman strangled six hours after she’s arranged her own funereal. A private detective uncovering secrets but hiding his own. A reluctant author drawn into a story he can’t control. What do they have in common?

This novel marks the start of a new detective series set in London by global bestseller Anthony Horowitz, promising buried secrets and a bloody trail of clues.

Release date: 24th August

The Scandal by Fredrik Backman

The town of Beartown, Sweden, is on the verge of a revival. Change is in the air and a new future just around the corner. Until the day it is all put in jeopardy by a single brutal act. It divides the town into those who think it should be hushed up and forgotten, and those who’ll risk the future to see justice done.

Backman is already a bestselling author and has had his books published in more than 35 countries. His newest offering promises to be a tense, empathetic story of friendship and loyalty.

Release date: 10th August

Are You Sleeping by Kathleen Barber

Josie Buhrman has spent the last 10 years trying to escape the tragic events of her past. Now, she has a new life in New York with her boyfriend, Caleb. The only problem is that she has lied to Caleb about every detail of her past.

It’s been a while since I read a really gripping psychological thriller, so I’m hoping this debut novel will offer just that.

Release date: 10th August

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Matt Haig’s new novel is sure to leave a smile on your face

How to Stop Time by Matt Haig

‘I am old. That is the first thing to tell you. The thing you are least likely to believe. If you saw me you would probably think I was about forty, but you would be very wrong.’

Tom Hazard may look like an ordinary 41-year-old, but owing to a rare condition, he’s been alive for centuries. From Elizabeth England to Jazz Age Paris, from New York to the South Seas, Tom has seen a lot, and now craves an ordinary life. Always changing his identity to stay alive, Tom has the perfect cover – working as a history teacher at a London comprehensive. The only thing he must not do is fall in love.

Matt Haig had a tough act to follow after the phenomenal success of last year’s part-biography, part-self-help-book Reasons to Stay Alive. It was one of my favourite books of 2016, and one I have dipped in and out of repeatedly since buying it. So I was prepared to love How to Stop Time. Although it had its flaws, Haig has continued his winning formula of crafting believable, hopeful stories that leave the reader with a smile on their face.

Let’s get the flaws out of the way first. The premise is interesting but it’s been done before and Haig stumbles further into cliché by having his protagonist, Tom, meet various real life people along the way; he is hired by Shakespeare and sails the seas with Captain Cook, among others.

One of the things I love about Haig’s writing is the hope. His books are full of darkness but among all the shadows there are wonderful moments of hope and joy. There is hope in How to Stop Time, but it takes a while to get there and it becomes quite taxing to follow a character who spends so much time mourning the past.

However, there was a lot I enjoyed about this novel. There are moments of piercing insight that make you pause and put down the book as you contemplate their genius. Haig has always found a way to interpret the messy, confusing business of being human with language that is simple yet astoundingly perceptive. He understands people, and creates his characters in an honest and believable way.

With Tom having been alive for such a long time, he finds he is losing himself in the grand scheme of things, feeling smaller and smaller against the backdrop of the ever-rolling wheel of history. This book charts his journey to accepting that there is nothing he can do about the progression of time; he can only try to make the most of it, and lose himself in the pleasure of a moment.

Tom is also a member of the Albatross Society (so named because albatrosses were believed to live for a long time). The Society is formed of people like Tom and its purpose is to prevent ordinary humans, or ‘mayflies’, from finding out that there are people who can live to be 800-years-old. The Society added a much-needed thriller element to the story, with the increasing threat of the Society’s founder, Hendrich, hanging over Tom as the story hurries along to an exciting and tense ending.

Although it’s fairly obvious what’s going to happen at the end of the book, it still leaves you with a feeling of lightness, a desire to go out and live life and make the most of it all. Despite its flaws, it is life-affirming stuff and guaranteed to leave a spring in your step.

Many thanks to Canongate for sending a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Dark Peter Pan retelling has edges sharp enough to cut

Lost Boy by Christina Henry

Those who didn’t listen so well or weren’t happy as the singing birds in the trees found themselves in the fields of the Many-Eyed without a bow or left near the pirate camp or otherwise forgotten, for Peter had no time for boys who didn’t want his adventures.

Peter brings Jamie to his island because there are no rules and no grownups to make them mind. He brings boys from the Other Place to join in the fun, but Peter’s idea of fun is sharper then a pirate’s sword. Because it’s never been all fun and games on the island. Peter promised they would all be young and happy forever. Peter lies.

I picked up Lost Boy in Waterstones without ever having heard of it or its author before. I wasn’t expecting it to be anything special, but I haven’t been this excited to write about a book in a long while. This Peter Pan prequel turned out to be one of those unexpected reads that comes out of nowhere and completely knocks your socks off.

This is a brilliant novel. Fairy tale retellings are 10 a penny but this one is different; it has edges sharp enough to cut and will keep you up way past your bedtime. Henry creates incredible suspense – even though everyone already knows the story – so that you’re never sure what is just around the corner, or waiting on the next turn of the page.

Our narrator is Jamie, a boy who has been living on Peter Pan’s island for as long as he can remember. During all those years of never growing up, Jamie has looked up to Peter, has loved him with all his heart and trusted him always. But things are changing on the island, and Jamie starts to see Peter in a new light.

The Peter Pan of this book is one of the most frightening characters I’ve ever read. He cares only for fun and games, for adventures and laughter, but what matters to him most is that the other boys all adore him. The moment one of them starts to doubt him is the moment they no longer matter to him, and there are plenty of ways on the island for a careless boy to disappear.

Lost Boy is strongly reminiscent of Lord of the Flies, with its group of boys trapped on an island, the captivating claustrophobic atmosphere and the sense that something very, very bad is just seconds away from happening.

In Henry’s hands the sugar-sweet Disney-fied version of Peter Pan becomes a terrifying portrait of a ‘mad child’ whose idea of fun is killing pirates and watching boys fight to the death. The other boys are little more than toys that he picks up and puts down as he wishes, but he is so charming and brave that they can’t help but love him. Only Jamie understands Peter’s true cruel, manipulative nature, but even he isn’t immune to Peter’s influence.

I would highly recommend this book. Even if you’re not usually a fantasy fan, the characters and gripping storytelling will plunge you headfirst into a horrifying world of blood and loyalty, twisting and turning as it leads you to its thrilling, inexorable end.

New novel explores how female criminals are judged by the media

Little Deaths by Emma Flint

‘When tragedy strikes, there’s a tendency to assume that someone is different. Special. That there’s something about them that makes them the kind of person bad things happen to. Because the alternative – that bad things can happen to anyone, at any time – is unthinkable.’

New York, 1965. One morning, Ruth Malone wakes to find her two young children missing. After a desperate search, the police make a horrifying discovery. It’s every mother’s worst nightmare. But Ruth Malone is not like other mothers. Noting Ruth’s perfect make-up and provocative clothing, the empty bottles of alcohol and love letters that litter her apartment, the detectives leap to convenient conclusions. But is Ruth really capable of murder?

I was really intrigued by this book, having heard some great things about it. But, overall, the execution failed to live up to the promise of the idea.

The pace of the book was the main element that threw me off. We learn early on that Ruth is in prison, so throughout the investigation and trial there is no suspense about what is going to happen. I didn’t realise that this is partly a police procedural novel (a genre I am not particularly fond of) and that at least half the chapters are focused on a journalist named Pete who is investigating the story of the missing children, and in the process becomes obsessed with Ruth.

The writing is good, but lacks the flashes of brilliance that would have elevated this book to a truly great read. Some of the themes are really interesting and I found Ruth a sympathetic and well-written character. She cares deeply for her children but she becomes easily exasperated by them. Her life hasn’t turned out anything like she thought it would and her disappointment is, in the eyes of the media, enough to mark her out as a bad person – and possibly a murderer.

Even set in the 1960s, this book bears poignant relevance to our world today. Ruth might not be talked about and judged on social media, but in the claustrophobic working class environment where she lives, there’s always someone peeking through a net curtain and gossiping about the woman who comes home late.

If the focus had been entirely on Ruth, I think I would have enjoyed this book a lot more. Unfortunately, much of the story is focused on journalist Pete Wonicke. He is an entirely unmemorable character who quickly becomes exasperating with his unrealistic actions. I wanted to know more about Ruth, and I wanted Flint to delve further into the themes she just begins to pick at, especially the way female criminals are judged by the media.

I was also extremely disappointed by the ending. It seemed completely unconvincing and came out of the blue, and after that I was glad to put the book down.

This book definitely disappointed me, but fans of crime fiction will still find things to enjoy here. Just don’t expect it to blow your socks off.

A feminist historical novel set in Victorian Edinburgh

The Wages of Sin by Kaite Welsh

‘If you had seen us taking tea, you would have assumed we were serious-minded but perfectly normal young ladies – New Women, perhaps, of the kind that had sprung up in the past decade, who fancied themselves equal to men in terms of intellect, but nothing that a good dose of marriage and motherhood wouldn’t cure.

1892. Sarah Gilchrist has fled from London to Edinburgh in disgrace and is determined to become a doctor. As part of the University of Edinburgh’s first intake of female medical students, Sarah comes up against resistance from lecturers, her male contemporaries, and her fellow woman. When one of her patients turns up in the university dissecting room as a battered corpse, Sarah finds herself drawn into Edinburgh’s dangerous underworld.

I was really looking forward to reading this book. It promised a dark plot, set in 19th century Edinburgh, with a female protagonist determined to become a doctor despite her family and society insisting that such a thing shouldn’t be allowed. In some ways, it delivered exactly what I was looking for. In others, however, it failed to impress.

I really enjoyed the feminist aspects of this novel. It offers an interesting perspective on the so-called ‘fallen woman’ and has plenty to say about the way marriage confines women and the dull lives they have in store once they find a husband. I particularly enjoyed the way Welsh presented the relationships between female characters, the way men and society conspire to turn them against each other.

I also enjoyed the way 19th century Edinburgh was brought to life on the page, with all its filth and poverty contrasted with the drawing rooms of the rich. We move from townhouses and the university to brothels and opium dens, with an interesting and varied cast of characters.

However, this novel did have its faults, foremost being the fact that Welsh didn’t seem to trust her readers to understand the rules of the Victorian society her characters inhabit. So she repeats how unfair life is to women over and over again, until I became completely exasperated by it. There is just no subtlety to it.

I have no idea how Sarah managed to get into the University of Edinburgh because she makes some terrible decisions that suggest she is in fact rather foolish. Gifted at medicine she may be, but in her everyday life her actions will have readers hanging their heads in despair. Shall I follow this suspected murderer down a dark alleyway? Should I deliberately seek to be alone with this suspected murderer when he has already threatened me? Of course! Why wouldn’t I?

The writing was average, with good atmosphere at times, and Welsh clearly wrote this novel with the intention of beginning a series featuring aspiring doctor Sarah Gilchrist. I can’t be sure whether I’ll be picking up the next instalment – it will depend on how good the plot sounds – but if you enjoy Victorian crime novels you’re sure to enjoy this one.

Many thanks to Tinder Press for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review

Paula Hawkins’ second novel bears similarities to Broadchurch

I was thinking about what I was going to say to you when I got there, how I knew you’d done this to spite me, to upset me, to frighten me, to disrupt my life. To get my attention, to drag me back to where you wanted me. And there you go, Nel, you’ve succeeded: here I am in the place I never wanted to come back to, to look after your daughter, to sort out your bloody mess.

In the days before her death, Nel called her sister. Jules didn’t pick up the phone, ignoring her plea for help. Now Nel is dead. They say she jumped. And Jules has been dragged back to the one place she hoped she had escaped for good, to care for the teenage girl her sister left behind.

This has got to be one of the most anticipated books of 2017. Following the phenomenal success of The Girl on the Train, Hawkins has returned to the psychological thriller genre that made her a star. Comparisons to her first novel are inescapable, and it was almost inevitable that Into the Water was not going to be as good as Hawkins’ debut.

The main problem is one that most reviewers have picked up on: there are just too many narrators (11 in all). This means we are jumping around to different perspectives so often that we don’t become truly connected to any of them. As such, many of the characters are reduced to clichés and several could have been cut without it affecting the story too much.

Each of the narrators are very similar in tone and while some are written in first person, others are in third person, which just adds to the confusion. None of the characters react to events in a way that makes sense (many of them burst out laughing for no reason) and their motives seem forced. It’s very similar to Broadchurch; a small town where everyone has a secret and everyone has a connection to the person who died. But it lacked the tension and convincing characters to pull off such a plot.

Unlike The Girl on the Train, there is no tense, heart-stopping confrontation at the end, but it rather peters out with a confession. Even without comparisons to any other book, there’s no denying that Into the Water is lacking in suspense.

That’s not to say that this book is without its positives. Though some of the supernatural elements felt tagged on, I enjoyed the atmosphere and the constant, brooding presence of the Drowning Pool, where Nel’s body is found. The focus on memory and the tricks our own minds can play on us are interesting themes Hawkins explores throughout the book.

If you enjoy psychological thrillers, you will probably enjoy this book. However, if you found The Girl on the Train confusing, Into the Water is going to feel like a circus. Hawkins clearly took a gamble with this one, but it doesn’t quite pay off.

New book releases for June 2017

Godblind by Anna Stephens

There was a time when the Red Gods ruled the land. That time has long since passed and the neighbouring kingdoms of Mireces and Rilpor hold an uneasy truce. But after the death of his wife, King Rastoth is plagued by grief, leaving the kingdom of Rilpor vulnerable.

This has been called the most anticipated fantasy debut of the year – so it’s fair to say that my expectations are already pretty high.

Release date: 15th June

It’s Always the Husband by Michele Campbell

Kate, Aubrey, and Jenny first met as college roommates and soon became inseparable, despite their differences. 20 years later, one of them is standing at the edge of a bridge, and someone else is urging them to jump. How did things come to this?

A story of the complicated ties of friendship and the appeal of revenge.

Release date: 13th June

The Wages of Sin by Kaite Walsh

  1. Sarah Gilchrist has fled from London to Edinburgh in disgrace and is determined to become a doctor, despite the misgivings of her family and society. When one of her patients turns up as a battered corpse, Sarah finds herself drawn into Edinburgh’s dangerous underworld.

This book sounds right up my street. It’s dark, it’s historical, and it apparently features LGBT+ characters. What more can you want?

Release date: 1st June

The Lying Game by Ruth Ware

At school Isa and her three best friends used to play the Lying Game. They competed to convince people of the most outrageous stories. Now, after 17 years of secrets, something terrible has been found on the beach, something that will force Isa to confront her past.

I read Ware’s In A Dark Dark Wood last year and was impressed by the writing (though less so by the plot) and am keen to see if her latest offering is an improvement.

Release date: 15th June

The Alice Network by Kate Quinn

Two women – a female spy recruited to the Alice Network in France during WWI, and an unconventional American socialite searching for her cousin in 1947 – are brought together in a story of courage and redemption.

I’ve never read anything by Quinn before – not least because historical novels about war often focus on men, while this one seems to focus on women.

Release date: 21st June

The Child by Fiona Barton

When a paragraph in a newspaper reveals a decades-old tragedy, most readers barely give it a glance. But for three strangers it’s impossible to ignore. For one woman, it’s a reminder of the worst thing that ever happened to her. For another, it reveals the dangerous possibility that her darkest secret is about to be discovered.

I’ve yet to read Barton’s The Widow, a psychological thriller released last year, but it became a Sunday Times bestseller, which bodes well for this second offering.

Release date: 29th June

The Good Widow by Liz Fenton and Lisa Steinke

Jacqueline ‘Jacks’ Morales’s marriage was far from perfect, but it was always familiar. That is, until two police officers tell her that her husband, who should have been on a business trip to Kansas, had suffered a fatal car accident in Hawaii. And he wasn’t alone.

This sounds like a twisty, turny thriller perfect for beach reading.

Release date: 1st June

Our Dark Duet by Victoria Schwab

Nearly six months after Kate and August were first thrown together, the war between the monsters and the humans is a terrifying reality. August has become the leader he never wished to be, and Kate has become the ruthless hunter she knew she could be.

This is the sequel and conclusion to This Savage Song, an urban fantasy novel from the author of the bestselling A Darker Shade of Magic. I love everything Schwab writes and no doubt her latest offering will be just as dark and gorgeous as her others.

Release date: 13th June

Beren and Lúthien by J.R.R. Tolkien

Restored from Tolkien’s manuscripts, this epic tale will reunite fans with Elves and Men, Dwarves and Orcs, and the rich landscape and creatures unique to Tolkien’s Middle Earth.

I’m not entirely sure whether I’ll read this one, though I’m a huge fan of The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings. But in any case, the release of a new story by Tolkien – published for the first time as a continuous and standalone story – is a momentous event.

Release date: 1st June

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (House Editions) by J.K. Rowling

Okay, admittedly not a new book at all, but to celebrate 20 years since the publication of Rowling’s first Potter novel, four special editions are being released for each of the four Hogwarts houses: Gryffindor, Slytherin, Ravenclaw and Hufflepuff. But this isn’t just about owning a beautiful new edition; fans will also find fact files and profiles of favourite characters within the pages.

Release date: 1st June